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Archive for November, 2010

Dear Readers,

Happy Thanksgiving!  We hope that you enjoyed a great feast with family and friends.  We gave thanks to God for all of our blessings and prayed for those less fortunate.

Here is another blog that focuses on bringing you authors of Jane Austen fiction.

Austen Authors: Thanksgiving Day during the Federal Era

Hope you enjoy!

Sincerely,
…Miguelina

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Dear Readers,

It was Queen Charlotte, the German-born wife of King George III and mother of the Prince Regent, who introduced the first Christmas tree to England.  A decorated yew tree was placed in the Queen’s Lodge in Windsor for the children of leading families. The Queen arranged a table with toys that she handed out as families came with their children to see the tree.

During Jane Austen’s time, Christmas was celebrated with visitors entering the front parlor, which was extravagantly decorated for a Christmas Ball, complete with holly and ivy as well as the traditional spring of mistletoe.  There were large gatherings of family and friends. Entertainment consisted of  parlor games and perhaps dancing.  Some games like Charades or bobbing for apples are still with us, but others like Snapdragon have long disappeared.

To play Snapdragon, each person had to pick currants out of a shallow bowl of flaming brandy using their mouth to extinguish the flame.  For obvious reasons, this parlor game eventually lost favor.
All the rooms of the house would have also been decorated to show visitors both the entertaining centers and behind-the-scenes activities of the owners, their children, and the servants.

With so many guest visiting the house, the kitchen was always abuzz with activity, leaving servants little time to enjoy the holidays.  From preparing large feasts and special desserts like Twelfth Night cake and Christmas Pudding to increased laundry and housework, a servant’s day began before dawn and lasted long into the night.

Happy Holidays!

Sincerely,

…Miguelina and Pamela

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Dear Readers,

The title of Prince Regent was commonly associated with the descendant of King George III, whose son, George IV, became His Royal Highness The Prince Regent during his father’s inability to rule England due to his mental illness.

Regent’s Park and Regent Street in London are named after him.

This period in England was known as the Regency Period.

The title was conferred by the Regency Act, which were acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed at various times, to provide a regent if the monarch were to be incapacitated or a minor (under the age of 18) inherited the throne.  The Act was passed in February of 1811.  Subject to certain limitations for a period, the Prince Regent was able to exercise the full powers of the King.

The Prince of Wales continued as regent until his father’s death in 1820, when

he became King George IV.

However, his journey to the throne was not without incident.  By the time he was 30, the Prince was a dedicated hedonist, drunk, and lecher. Unfortunately, this was the image the public recognized.  His headquarters were at the Carlton House, a mansion off Pall Mall, where he gathered with a wide circle of friends: politicians, gamblers, scholars, courtesans, society hostesses, and jockeys.  It was the exploits that took place at the Carlton House that set much of the mood of Regency society.

Hope you enjoy this bit of information and that you look forward to more on the Regency Period.

Sincerely,
…Miguelina

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The Titled

Dear Readers,

There were two orders of the titled during the Regency period. One was the Peerage, which included the dukes, marquesses, earls, viscounts and barons (ranked in order).  The second titled group, who were not considered Peers, were the baronets and knights, who were always addressed as “Sir.”

Together with bishops and archbishops of the church, the Peers composed the House of Lords.

Titles were almost always passed from father to eldest son, but if no son was born into that family, then often  the title would end, or else it was passed to the next oldest male in the direct line of descent.

Sincerely,

…Miguelina

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Good evening, Dear Readers.

This is the first installment for The Regency Inkwell.

As a lover of the Regency Period, I am in the process of creating writings set in England from this time period. I am a fan of Jane Austen, but my work does not mimic hers.

I am writing a mystery-romance novel set in the Regency Period and have started a second novel. It will be a series of seven novels, each one focused on one of the seven deadly sins, and each containing the same foundation of characters, two young women with a talent for solving mysteries and getting into danger, and the two young men, a baronet and an attorney, who care for them and share their adventures.

More will be coming soon. Until then, take care, pick up a good book or just plainly write one.

…Miguelina

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